Past IEM Features tagged: mslp

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Pressure Change

17 Apr 2014 05:36 AM
Are you old like me and do not enjoy it when the pressure changes as various parts of the body start to ache? The featured map displays the total amount of pressure change for the year to date. This value represents the amount the mean sea level pressure observation has changed hour to hour for the year. The largest values (most change) are in southeastern Colorado / northeastern New Mexico while the lowest values (least change) are along the coast in southern California. The maximum area is the preferred location for low pressure systems to develop thanks to geography and the jet stream. If you are bothered by pressure changes, you may wish to move to Florida or the coast of California!

Voting:
Good: 21
Bad: 6
Abstain: 4

Tags:   mslp   pressure  


Higher and Lower Pressure

05 Dec 2013 05:49 AM
Low pressure systems get all the publicity as they are the ones that bring the precipitating weather and are called storm systems. On Wednesday, such a system rapidly deepened over the Midwest before departing to our north early this morning. The featured chart displays the reported mean sea level pressure values from the airport weather stations over the Midwest since Tuesday. It is interesting to notice that while pressure was dropping over some sites, other sites were experiencing an increase in pressure as the high pressure system moved in from our west and strengthened as well. We typically do not think of high pressure systems strengthening at the same time the low pressure system is deepening as well. These changes help to increase pressure gradients, which ultimately drive increased wind speeds.

Voting:
Good: 33
Bad: 5
Abstain: 4

Tags:   mslp   pressure  


Drop in pressure

18 Oct 2012 05:33 AM
A strong fall storm system is currently providing Iowa with plenty of wind and severe weather over the southern plains. Our sea level pressure has dropped below 1000 mb for the first time since May. The featured chart looks at some climatological aspects to the mean sea level pressure (MSLP) reading for Des Moines. The top chart presents the range of observations for each day of the year since 1960. The range in pressure is much smaller during the summer time due to the strong storm system tracks being further north and the air mass dominance of warm air. The bottom chart is an attempt at showing the relative frequency of pressure readings and the variability of the fall, winter, and spring months can clearly be seen. These larger differences in pressure help to drive stronger winds as will be the case for today!

Voting:
Good: 26
Bad: 13

Tags:   mslp   pressure